Riots Job Requirements are ridiculous

  • https://riotgames-openhire.silkroad....on=1&jobid=181


    - Work tirelessly to launch the League of Legends brand into a new dimension of brand recognition and reach, forging a cohesive marketing strategy and identifying new avenues for recognition and exposure



    Experienced: youÂ’ve got ten or more years of professional marketing or brand management experience building kickass brands with wide reach;

    wtf rofl..thats just a few
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    Originally Posted by Light LaserTower View Post
    School: "When you get out of here everyone will be at your door step trying to hire you for all the jobs you can Imagine"

    Reality: "You believed that shit, LMAO, why the heck would I want you when there are 100 000 people with your schooling and 10+ years of experence"
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    Honestly, this. School and education are valuable, but a degree does not get you a job, it lets you start trying to get a job that requires a degree. There's no entitlement df

    Requirements aren't there to make people feel warm and fuzzy, they're there to make sure people have the appropriate skillset. Some jobs are fine with less experience (design can be one of these!), others are not.
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    Originally Posted by Vodka and Kush View Post
    wtf rofl..thats just a few
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    We only hire the best few.
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    Originally Posted by Kaosovic View Post
    @Morello

    Hey Morello, I'm curious. Your voice carries a lot of weight on here. Without making this personal, I know most of the LoL crew are fairly young just by watching the live tournament casts, what qualifies top leadership within Riot for LoL? Considering the impact of the company I think it's neat to see such a successful project in the hand of a younger generation.

    I mean to say, does having the vision to innovate around a largely successful product category and constantly update according to demand characterize the skill set? Or is it more a leadership style.

    I know you have a variety of skills on the team - macro data analysts, programmers, artists, hr programs I imagine, etc. a professionalized environment. So what distinguishes top brass at Riot?

    Just curious if you can answer this in a transparent way. I always wonder how people of young tech companies fit the bill, and given Riot's success, you guys have something going for you.
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    Good question, let me try to do it justice.

    Some of it is raw ability in your field (such as design, art, etc), but leadership and senior contributor are different paths, with different requirements. Let me talk a bit about that;

    Imagine someone that is an amazing game designer, but doesn't like leading people and coaching them. This would lead them onto the path of Principle Designer. This path has them doing more and more difficult designs, but without being the core leader (though all design requires some leadership at Riot). Someone like Xypherous is a great example.

    Alternatively, someone who is a great designer who also can coach, mentor, set direction and lead goes into leadership - jobs like Lead Champion/Lead Live Designer, Lead Designer, Design Director, or VP of Game Design. You do less game design in these roles, day-to-day, but handle strategic issues and spend more time with people than with scripts. I fall squarely into this category these days, as does Zileas.

    Both roles require a mastery of craft, but they focus on different strengths and have different workdays. I spend a LOT of time in meetings or working with individual designers on game theory or helping them when they're in the weeds. A Principle designer (we have none yet since we have a pretty inexperienced team overall - many of our designers are first-time designers, including all the ones you guys know!) would be devising new systems or even entire game pitches, unraveling the toughest design challenges and other difficult problems, and implementing it themselves.

    For Leadership, though, you have to have the ability to work strategically, collaborate like a mother****er, and look at the big picture. Additionally, I think it's a requirement to be able to motivate and inspire people, resolve conflict effectively and keep things objective and goal-oriented.
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    Originally Posted by Calys Teneb View Post
    I wish my grandparents would read this. I've been going to school off and on for about five or six years, but in between I do a lot of contract work at Microsoft or Amazon working on app stores, Kinect, or Xbox. My experience is more valuable to me than focusing on a degree with no experience to back it up.

    A degree helps but experience is boss, from what I've seen of this industry, for most positions.
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    Depends a lot on the job - I chose experience over college myself, but some people (Zileas or Lyte) have really elite degrees from top schools.
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    Originally Posted by Levj View Post
    I see two groups of people here. Entitlement based people and everyone else. In this economy you should be thrilled anyone is hiring.
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    Feeling like you're entitled to anything in the workforce is a way to never get hired anywhere good.
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    Originally Posted by Sythest View Post
    No offense, but how do companies expect young and fresh minds with requirements like those? It's those type of companies, those that don't even take the time to grant on the job experience and see how it pans out that leave college kids feeling nervous when they graduate. I see what you're saying about companies having a set standard but there are tricks at a great job that you can learn that you would learn in a class room with many other people.
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    Because not 100% of jobs are entry-level.
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    Originally Posted by Berri Bunny View Post
    ^ Proof of Morello not knowing jack ****.
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    do you even lift
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    Originally Posted by Berri Bunny View Post
    Why do you only respond to asinine, pointless posts?
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    Like yours? Good question.
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    Originally Posted by Rooster Raiden View Post
    No offense, Morello, but experience often doesn't mean anything either. Experience and education are only correlative to desired traits. Neither necessarily imply anything.


    Having requirements such as 10 years experience is probably not getting you the best of the bunch. A few years? Yes. 10 years? Now you are just hiring like minded individuals. That gimps you. Of course I'm not saying Riot is necessarily guilt of this. I'm just saying the whole "education means nothing, experience means something" is stupid.

    It's just a way of thought, unfounded.
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    Education and experience are valuable only in context - certain roles need a deep understanding of subjects of conventions (even if the desire is to break those conventions) and others don't. In design, we often hire high talent/low experience for most Associate jobs.