@Praeco or any other willing Riot Audio Team member ~

  • I was just curious about the inside work of Riot's Audio people. Did you have interest in this industry early? And what really helped you break through and become employed as an Audio engineer as I am told it is a very difficult area of work. Where do you draw the experience needed to fulfill the job requirements of a Riot employee, which are exceptionally high? If anyone could take the time to respond I would be very grateful
  • Hey,

    Most of our Sound Designers have been working in the industry for a while. Naturally, in this industry in general, a lot is about networking and "being in the right place at the right time". The audio aspect of the video game industry is very small, so it's not that easy to seek out people. The best thing one can do is go to GDC, PAX, stuff like that, as there's always tons of audio people there, and it's easy to just walk up to people and chat. In those times of e-mails and tweets, a personal conversation is much appreciated to get an idea of whether or not the person would be a culture fit. That is the number one thing at Riot. Being the right fit for the team.
  • Quote:
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    Originally Posted by Aevethix View Post
    I was just curious about the inside work of Riot's Audio people. Did you have interest in this industry early? And what really helped you break through and become employed as an Audio engineer as I am told it is a very difficult area of work. Where do you draw the experience needed to fulfill the job requirements of a Riot employee, which are exceptionally high? If anyone could take the time to respond I would be very grateful
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    TLDR; Practice, Seek Feedback, Network, Be Yourself

    To followup on what Praeco mentioned, a lot of it starts with being in the right place at the right time, but then its what you make of the opportunity once it arises. I had always been interested in sound, but really focused on games as I was finishing school. After school my first job I actually started in publisher QA, then moved to dev QA, then dev Audio Team QA, and finally was in a good spot to get a chance to do sound design as a project was finishing. At each stage it was a different situation about what was required. I learned some tough lessons early at my first company, but the one thing that has always helped me out is making a point to try and learn from every experience.

    Taking time to reflect on decisions both good and bad and seek out feedback from others can go a long way to knowing your strengths and weaknesses and trying to round out your skill set.

    Another thing that helped me when I was first starting out is to always be designing sound or practicing your skills. Don't wait for projects, seek them out, work for free, make up your own projects, find ways and people to collaborate with (networking has paid off in my case, and many others I know), set goals each day for one thing you want to learn, etc. If you have talent it can go a long way to getting you noticed. But remember as Praeco said culture fit is a big deal, talent alone won't help if nobody wants to work with you.